top of page
Search
  • José R. Hernández

How to Avoid Pet Damage to a Rental Property

Avoiding pet damage to a rental property requires tenants to consider multiple factors. First, pet owners should ensure that the proper pet exercise, training, and health needs are met in the rental property's environment. They should also be aware of their pet policy, as they must understand and adhere to any pet rules outlined by landlords. Furthermore, pet owners may need to take extra steps to protect their investment, like adding additional pet-proofing measures to the property and regularly checking for damage. By being proactive about pet owners' responsibilities, tenants can avoid costly damages to their rental property.



What Is Pet Damage?

Pet damage is a problem that can affect any household with animals. It refers to scratches, rips, and other damages they may cause to a property. For example, unruly pets may chew through furniture or frames, scratch walls, doors, and carpet, and even lead to infestations of pests like fleas if left unchecked. Although many pet owners can prevent the worst of this type of damage with careful training and diligent care of the animal, prevention is not always possible.


Pet Fees and Pet Rent Don't Cover Damages

One standard fee that landlords charge for tenants with pets is a pet fee. This fee is usually a one-time, non-refundable fee that the tenant pays when they move in. The pet fee does not cover any damage that the pet may cause to the property. The landlord may also charge a higher rent for tenants with pets. The higher rent covers the increased wear and tear pets can cause on a rental unit. Landlords may also require tenants to pay a pet deposit. The pet deposit is refundable if the tenant does not damage the property with their pet.


Read and Understand Your Pet Policy

Reading and understanding the pet policy on a lease agreement is essential for pet owners. Most pet policies include pet rent, pet fees, pet deposits, and other restrictions such as size and breed limits. These costs should be factored into bringing a pet into leased property. Additionally, some leases may require pet owners to have additional measures such as periodic exterminator visits, flea preventatives, or other treatments to help ensure that a pet won't spread ticks or fleas throughout the property. Understanding these items in the pet policy will help pet owners make an informed decision about renting with pets.


Above All, Take Good Care of Your Pet

A pet can be an essential addition to a family; however, it is important to remember the responsibility of pet ownership. Taking good care of your pet – through proper exercise, training, and pet health maintenance – can be instrumental in preventing pet damage to the property. Regular pet exercise helps make your pet more physically fit and allows them to release energy and pent-up frustration that can lead to destructive behaviors. More importantly, regular pet training can help keep your pet under control in all kinds of situations while assisting them in learning how to behave appropriately both inside and outside of your home. Finally, maintaining good pet health helps your pet live a longer life and also helps your pet better cope with potential stress, which will reduce inappropriate behavior or destruction. Altogether, these three pieces are essential for avoiding pet damage to property.


Did I miss anything? Please, let me know in the comments! Also, please subscribe to our blog to receive notifications when new articles arrive.



6 views0 comments
bottom of page